Movies

Marvel Phase 4’s New Chinese Super Hero Shang-Chi

Movie Review:

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

Rating: 8 out of 10 stars

Warning! Spoilers below!

Overview

Pros

  • Amazing CGI
  • Likeable characters
  • The fight scenes are fun to watch
  • The movie was amusing at times
  • Interesting music

Cons

  • Predictable plot
  • Not very convincing love story between Wenwu and Li
  • Slattery understanding the hundun with such precision was unrealistic
  • Wenwu sends assassins with orders to try to kill Shang-Chi and Xialing, when he really just wants to capture them

Observations

  • Aren’t they technically bracelets, not rings?

Review

The movie begins with the story of how Wenwu finding the magical Ten Rings and obtaining the powers of a god as well as immortality (which, I must say, does not help him much against soulsuckers. He should have read the fine print.)

Wenwu then founded an organization which he called the Ten Rings, probably because it sounds better than the Ten Bracelets. But I mean really–what would you call a large circular piece of jewelry that fits on your arm–a bracelet, right? But I have to admit, ring does sound cooler. You could even say it has more of a ring to it.

I know, that was bad.

Then we fast forward to 1996, when Wenwu tries to conquer Ta Lo and is stopped by Ying Li, who uses really dramatic and flowy martial arts–in other words, fancy dancing–to turn Wenwu’s own power against him. If their battle scene is 2x slower than most of the movie, then their falling in love was 10x faster. It’s more of a tell don’t show sort of scenario, where we don’t get much evidence of the love they share until the lady is dead.

Wenwu and Ying Li

The music at first I thought was okay, but later in the movie I felt like it fit the vibe more.

Then we go even more forward to modern times, where we meet parking valet “Shaun” and his best friend Katy, who are surprisingly not forced into a romantic relationship by the director despite this movie being both Disney and Marvel.

Katy and Shaun

We get a scene in a bar where Shaun and Katy explain how Katy prevented Shawn from getting beaten up by this big xenophobic dude by singing Hotel California. I love Katy. She is funny and relatable and does what she wants to do without worrying what others will think.

We get to see the main characters rock out in a karaoke night, which in my opinion was a smart move because it says a lot about their personalities. What is more personable than karaoke? It just made them even more likeable.

The bus scene though–that was amazing. Shaun was attacked by several assassins including one with a blade for an arm. I don’t know how he manages to retract and store that inside his arm when he is not using it. And what if it malfunctioned and slid out at the wrong moment? He could accidentally skewer someone.

Shaun using his martial arts ability while working with instead of against the environment of a moving bus was ingenious. The brakes getting cut and the bus breaking in half were a bit out there, but hey, this is Marvel we’re talking about. Katy needed a role and steering the bus without brakes made her pretty damn important.

The MVP of this scene was definitely a civilian (pictured above) who was recording the whole fight and grading it based on his limited experience with martial arts. His complete disregard for his own safety and complete confidence in Shaun did not seem realistic but was funny.

There is a moment when the bus flattens a ton of parked vehicles and all I can think of are dollar signs and a feeling of gratitude that they were empty parked cars because seeing people flattened by a bus would have been nauseating.

The man with the blade for an arm who attacked Shaun on the bus managed to steal the special necklace Shaun had been given by his deceased mother, and that, along with a postcard Shaun received in the mail, makes Shaun think his little sister is in trouble.

As a result, even though Shaun has been remarkably unconcerned with his sister’s whereabouts while he recovered from trauma of his own, he now seeks her out. Probably feeling guilty about promising to return to her years ago. But I don’t blame him much because he had to deal with his trauma, which is significant.

Katy demands to come along, because we need comic relief. I mean, because the martial arts master Shaun obviously needs civilian help. Ok ok, it’s because she is a great friend.

Shaun tells Katy his life story on the plane. She finds it hilarious that he tried to go into hiding by changing his name from Shang-Chi to Shaun–since they both sound very similar. He tells her that when his father sent him to kill the leader of the Iron Gang, the man who had been responsible for Shang-Chi’s mother’s death, he didn’t go through with it. That is a lie; in actuality, he killed the man and then ran away from home.

After that, the movie is pretty predictable. Shang-Chi fights his sister Xialing in a fight club, which most people would see coming from a mile away. She wins, which is also to be expected because Marvel always wants to establish a strong female figure, at least in their more modern films. That’s a good thing; it’s just predictable that she will win against Shang-Chi because of it.

Finally, after sending assassins to attack his children twice, Wenwu himself shows up. Now since his whole point was to capture his children, I have no idea why he sent assassins who tried to kill his children. I know, he said that he knew the assassins wouldn’t be able to kill them, but why do that rather than try to just capture them in the first place? Other than to create a series of entertaining fight scenes. Overall, he’s not winning any dad points.

When they arrive at their old home, Wenwu tells his children that he has been hearing the voice of his wife asking him to rescue her. Only problem is, she was murdered by the Iron Gang over ten years ago. Shang-Chi, Xialing and Katy don’t believe him, and are horrified when they find out that if Wenwu cannot find his wife in her hometown in Ta Lo, he plans on destroying the town and everyone in it.

Because what better way to honor someone’s memory than to deny their death and massacre everyone in their hometown?

Shang-Chi, Xialing, and Katy are locked up for disbelieving Wenwu, and while in prison they meet Trevor Slattery, the man who impersonated the Mandarin in an Iron Man movie. He admits how ridiculous the whole Mandarin story and impersonation was, which was apparently a way to apologize for the racial stereotypes associated with that character. Since he has no other good reason to show up in the movie, he seems out of place.

Slattery has a companion hundun, a weird creature with no head or mouth, just four wings and plenty of fur. He can understand it perfectly for reasons that are never explained.

Shang-Chi and the gang find it pretty easy to escape the prison, and to reach the forest protecting Ta Lo. When there, they take remarkably precise instructions from the hundun, translated by Slattery. I don’t think they should have made that such a huge plot point, because Slattery understanding the hundun is unexplained and makes no sense in the first place.

Shang-Chi and Xialing meet their Auntie Nan, who has the same abilities as her sister Ying Li and has the potential to stop Wenwu. However, for whatever reason she trains Shang-Chi to do it instead of fighting Wenwu herself.

We learn that the voice Wenwu is hearing is coming from the soulsuckers behind a walled-in portal. Wenwu does not believe that, and despite Shang-Chi’s efforts to stop him, Wenwu opens the portal. He is subsequently killed by a soulsucker, despite being “immortal”.

The CGI in Ta Lo is amazing in general, but the soulsucker and the dragon are probably the best. The dragon awakens from underwater, I guess to provide another beautiful instance of over-the-top CGI.

The major soulsucker tries to suck the soul out of the dragon, and is only stopped by Katy’s well-placed arrow. Despite having only several hours of training, she managed a perfect shot. Unrealistic but impressive. Shang-Chi takes the opportunity to kill the soulsucker, thus ending the battle between good and evil.

Having saved the world, Shang-Chi and Katy go back to the United States and tell their disbelieving friends. In a mid-credits scene, Wong invites them to meet Bruce Banner and Carol Danvers, and they find out that the rings are some sort of beacon. Rather than getting a good night’s rest, Wong, Katy, and Shang-Chi spend the night doing karaoke. That has to be one of the greatest parts of the movie.

In a post-credits scene, it is revealed that Xialing has taken over the Ten Rings organization rather than disbanding it like she had told her brother she would.

In conclusion, while this movie was unrealistic at times, it was enjoyable and fun to watch. It was funny at times, serious at the right moments, and altogether interesting. I would recommend it for anyone ages 13 and up.

Links

Humor, Movies

So Now the Death Stare is Romantic?

Movie Analysis (with spoilers!!):

Twilight (2008)

Rating: 4 out of 10 stars

Intro

This analysis is a spoiler-filled review. If you don’t already know, my reviews that include spoilers are either for phenomenal movies that deserve analysis or movies that invite ridicule. I know many people enjoy the Twilight movies, but they are honestly poorly done and certainly not my style.

My siblings convinced me to watch it. I admit, romance is not my favorite genre, but this movie was particularly bad.

Background

Twilight was produced by Summit Entertainment and released in 2008.

The movie stars Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson, Billy Burke, and Peter Facinelli.

It can currently be watched on Netflix.

Analysis

The movie starts with 17-year-old Bella Swan leaving home to go live with her dad in Forks, Washington. This is followed by a scene in which Edward Cullen hunts and kills a deer. I think this is supposed to be serious, but seeing a guy come out of nowhere and grab a jumping deer was kind of hilarious. Watch the clip here.

There is something pretty respectable about deer hunting with a gun, but there is nothing remotely respectable about a pale teenager tackling a deer.

Soon afterwards we get to meet Jacob, one of Bella’s closest friends. His father Billy Black chats with them for awhile before trying to run someone over with his wheelchair. Bella hits Jacob with the door of the truck when she opens it, which reminds me of the movie Starstruck in which the heroine is hit by a car door. Both scenes are equally awkward, but the action seemed a little less pointless in Starstruck.

Bella joins in the middle of the semester, in March, and yet almost everyone with a speaking role either knows of her already or instantly is attracted to her. Mike introduces himself after she hits him in the back of the head with a volleyball, and he falls for her quickly. I guess it’s because she hit on him. Get it? With a volleyball?

(That was bad, I know.)

We meet the Cullen kids, who oddly enough are dating each other. I mean, I know that they are not technically biologically siblings, but it is still kind of strange to see the children of one family all around the exact same age and in love with each other.

The Cullen Teens

Immediately we get the first dramatic stare between Bella Swan and Edward Cullen. Now, if Edward’s stares were comparable to anything, it would be the infamous Luigi Death Stare from the Mariokart games.

When Bella walks in to the Biology classroom, there is a fan behind her that blows her hair around. I guess that’s supposed to be attractive, but really, it’s just awkward and contrived. And why is that giant fan even necessary? It’s March in a setting that is almost always rainy or overcast.

Bella ends up sitting beside Edward, who is obviously extremely uncomfortable. Something about Bella really rubs him the wrong way.

Notice the wings of the owl right behind Edward, making him look like some pasty-looking angel.

Anyway, Bella finds out Edward tried to quit Biology because he had to sit next to her and is understandably confused and annoyed.

Meanwhile, random people are being hunted and killed by vampires. My instinct was to blame the pale Cullen family, but apparently they are goodie-goodie vampires. Or what was it Edward said? That they were basically vegetarians. Who drink the blood of animals. So basically the opposite of a vegetarian…Yeah, he’s pretty bad at metaphors.

Despite the fact the relationship between Bella and Edward is supposed to be all romantic and cute, they have zero chemistry. They discuss the weather. They have apparently nothing in common. Edward apologizes, saying he is just trying to figure her out, as if she is a complex math problem instead of a one-note protagonist.

Then more staring until finally, the action starts! Bella almost is hit by a vehicle, which Edward stops easily with a hand. Before sneaking away, he stares deep into Bella’s eyes.

Then Bella dreams of Edward in her room. Or that is what she says happened. But I’m pretty sure if you’re awake when it happens, it’s either a hallucination or reality–not a dream. Later we will find out it’s the latter, which is so freakin’ creepy. Edward would literally be the perfect murderer if he was not a lovesick vampire.

“Bella, we shouldn’t be friends,” Edward says randomly a few days after their awkward interaction about the weather and Bella’s rescue from certain death. Bella really wants to be besties, however, because she won’t let him off the hook. He makes some stupid excuses suggesting he didn’t actually stop a car with his bare hands. Honestly, you would think someone who hid over a hundred years in plain sight would get used to lying about supernatural powers.

There’s a subsequent scene where an apple is dropped and it looks super unlikely and seems to serve no purpose. You can watch it here in the first few seconds of the video. The only reason I can think of for it being in the movie at all is that it could be a subtle reference to the cover art of Twilight.

Edward suggests that he is the bad guy in the story, which is not necessarily true. He’s just a 108-year-old man child who watches a girl minor sleep without her permission or knowledge long before they started dating.

You know what? Maybe he is a bad guy.

Another human bites the dust when the nomadic vampires come to feast again. Their fast movements look basically like the film was fast forwarded, not realistic at all.

Bella and her friends go dress shopping, but Bella is not into it. Clearly it’s another one of those “not like the other girls” tropes.

After dress shopping, poor helpless Bella is rescued from a bunch of potential rapists by Edward, who has been stalking her. He stares them down until they leave.

You heard me. He stares at them. I mean look at this. Wouldn’t it scare you away?

The Stare

I mean, it does make me uncomfortable. But I don’t see how it would be sufficient deterrent for a rowdy bunch of drunk rapists.

Edward tells Bella to distract him so he doesn’t go back and kill the men who were threatening Bella. Apparently that doesn’t clue her off to the fact that maybe, just maybe, he isn’t just a hot guy. On that note–he really isn’t, according to both of my siblings. I never think of people as hot, nor do I really understand what makes someone hot, so I can’t speak my mind on the subject, but I trust my siblings. This dude is not hot.

Then they bond over the fact that they both know the square root of pi. Now being a nerd is cool, in my opinion, but I still don’t like Bella or Edward, and especially not Bella and Edward.

He cannot read her mind, which is definitely not explained, at least in this movie. He can read everyone else’s mind, except hers. Now that makes me think of Nendo. In The Disastrous Life of Saiki K, Saiki K can read everyone’s mind, including animals, but he can’t read Nendo’s mind. Why? Because Nendo is so abysmally stupid. Maybe he can’t read her mind because she doesn’t think?

Edward has all these lackluster pick up lines that are creepy for any guy to use who doesn’t know her well. “I feel very protective of you” and “I don’t have the strength to stay away from you anymore.”

His hands are always cold, which I don’t know why she is cool with, because she literally says earlier how she dislikes cold things like rain.

Bella studies vampires when she gets the chance, reading articles in particular about Egyptian vampires. Because obviously if you are looking for info about vampires in the U.S., Egypt is the place to study.

Bella says the Edward is a vampire and he admits to it.

He also says he is 17 years old and has been for a long time. Now that’s simply inaccurate. If people were assigned ages based on appearance, I would have been marked down as a 12-year-old even when I was 17. No, age is based on how many years have elapsed since one’s birth. So yeah, he’s 108 years old.

Edward gives Bella an awkward superspeed piggy back ride to the top of the mountain to show off his sparkly skin. What’s better than a pasty vampire, you wonder? A bedazzled one, clearly. He seems to think he is hideous, but Bella apparently is attracted to people who could be used as disco balls.

And people who have killed. And people who subsist on blood. And people who literally have to resist the urge to eat her.

Edward compares their budding relationship to a lion falling in love with a lamb. This guy sucks at pickup lines. I mean, comparing yourself to a predator and your crush to prey is not the best way to get a date. But man, Bella is digging it.

Edward takes Bella to his house, where everyone is awkwardly nice to her except Rosalie, who without provocation destroys a poor salad bowl. The others do their best to whip up some dinner for her, but obviously are as clueless as me when it comes to cooking.

As they walk to Edward’s bedroom, they pass a wall of graduation caps. The five Cullen kids have graduated countless times, and all I can think is why? Why don’t they get jobs? Or move on? Why do they think they need to repeat high school in a new place over and over again.

There we learn that Edward doesn’t sleep, but we knew that. He wouldn’t have time anyway, what with watching Bella sleep.

They attempt dancing in the room, but Bella is reluctant and doesn’t really feel like it. He says, “Well, I could always make you.”

Um, what?

Then he calls her his spider monkey and carries her into the trees on his back. Spider monkey. That’s so cringey.

After more awkwardness, this interaction is finally over.

She has some father-daughter time. Her dad orders for them at the restaurant, picking a steak for himself and a salad for her. If my dad did that, I would be less than thrilled.

Next, a kissing scene that looks like…just not right. I’ve seen a lot of people kiss on TV, and their kissing looks more like the kissing from Jumanji than anything actually romantic.

The only other interesting things that happen in this movie is vampire baseball and the actual villain hunting Bella. And the baseball is just a bunch of superpowered people playing so loudly the thunder has to mask it. Then a rival team shows up, a bunch of vampires that want to play until they smell Bella. Then they just want a snack. (They have really short attention spans.)

One of them, James, hunts Bella until the end of the movie where he is burnt alive, but not before biting Bella. Yep, that got dark real quick.

Bella has vampire venom in her, which Edward sucks out of her. He is almost unable to stop himself from sucking out all her blood, but hey, no harm done.

She wakes up in a hospital bed with a broken leg.

The movie ends with a prom. I guess he did make her dance after all.

Conclusion

Overall, Twilight is a bizarre and unconvincing romance. If this is what romance is supposed to look like, I want nothing to do with it. I would not recommend it for any audience, unless you just want a few laughs.

Rating System

If you are interested in how I rate movies, check out my rating system.

Links

Acknowledgements

Thank you to Finch for their feedback on this article.

Movies

The Best and Worst of The Princess Bride

Intro

I love this movie. I was first introduced to The Princess Bride as a child, and watched it again as a college student, and then a third time as a master’s student. It’s hilarious from beginning to end, with a few serious parts spliced in for dramatic effect.

Just as a warning, there are spoilers below!

Background

The Princess Bride (1987) is a fantasy comedy film based on the novel of the same name written by William Goldman.

It can currently be watched on Disney Plus.

The Best and Worst of The Princess Bride

An Expertly Done Frame Story

The Best:

The frame narrative of the ailing grandson becoming increasingly interested in his grandfather’s enchanting book is heartwarming. The interruptions to return to this frame story are well placed and add to both the suspense and the character of the film. I do not usually like frame stories, but I felt that this one is well done and adds rather than detracts from the story.

I love the way that the grandfather brings the book as a wrapped present for his grandson. It reminds me of when the library at my college wrapped books so that people could take them home and get a surprise. I chose one myself and was delightfully surprised with a story that I never would have picked out myself but that I enjoyed more than expected.

The kid’s response is priceless. He is not excited by a musty old book. (I definitely would have been even as a child.)

The Worst:

That the sick grandson is disinterested in his cheek-pinching grandfather and more apt to play video games than read is stereotypical of the way kids are portrayed in the media. That is not all that surprising, especially since it is often true of children that they are not especially likely to listen to the wisdom of their elders over the clever banter of a television or mobile device. It’s an old movie though, so ideas like this that are now overused were much newer and less worn out than they are now.

The Details:

Did you notice the assortment of Christmas themed craft projects in the room? When the camera shifts and you get a glimpse of the entirety of each figure, you see the creepiness that only the vaguely humanoid creations of children can impart. Or maybe it’s because I have always thought Santa was creepy. I mean, supposedly he sees you when you’re sleeping, like some sort of Twilight vampire.

Also, the kid has Garfield in the background of his room, which I can appreciate. Garfield is just plain funny. (Yeah, I like old stuff…)

Plus, am I the only one grossed out when people lick a finger before turning a page? When is that ever necessary? I have read hundreds, possibly even a couple thousand unique books, and I have never felt that the pages were so hard to turn that only my saliva would do the trick.

“As You Wish”

The Best: Now I don’t love romance, but I think it’s pretty sweet that Westley says “as you wish” to mean “I love you.” The fact that she convinces him to do things such as fetch a pitcher that’s hanging inches from her head in order to spend more time with him is kind of cute too.

Inconceivable

The Best: Vizzini keeps using this phrase as Westley is chasing him, adding humor to the dark scene of them kidnapping and planning to kill Buttercup.

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

Inigo Montoya

Fight Scene: Inigo vs. Westley

The Best:

Inigo Montoya’s fight with Westley is priceless. It begins with Inigo impatient with how long it is taking Westley to scale the cliffs, so in a display of foolish yet goodhearted sportsmanship, he throws him a rope. The level of trust becomes ridiculous when Inigo hands his sword over to Westley to inspect. Yet this is not poorly done, it is merely the revelation of a well-developed character who will have his own fascinating character arc. Including left-handed fighting for characters who are right-handed was clever too.

The Worst: The weapons are very strange choices, being long and thin rapier-style blades. At least Westley as a pirate is unlikely to have such a blade. Unlike real rapiers, they wobble at their tips considerably. The fight, with its spins and flips at times, is far from realistic, but I find myself not minding much because it’s a comedy.

Predicting the Future

Fezzik: Why do you wear a mask? Were you burned by acid, or something like that?

Westley: Oh no. It’s just they’re terribly comfortable. I think everyone will be wearing them in the future.

The Best: Westley successfully predicted the future! Everyone is wearing masks these days!

The Worst: Westley lied to us. They are not terribly comfortable, and for people who wear glasses like me, they tend to fog up glasses and impede sight, at least in winter.

The Details: Westley’s mask covers the top half of his face rather than the bottom half, so maybe it is more comfortable for him? I kind of doubt it.

The Battle of Wits

The Best: Vizzini, unlike Fezzik or Inigo, is no expert when it comes to physical prowess. He engages in a mental game with Westley, but it turns out to be a no-win situation for Vizzini. Cleverly, Westley puts poison in both drinks and convinces Vizzini that he must pick the one that is not poisoned and they will both drink at the same time. Only, Westley has built up an immunity to the poison and thus does not feel its effects. Vizzini’s intellect is at least not as immense as he believes that Australians are all criminals and thus do not trust each other and somehow connects that to the challenge at hand. It’s all very funny.

Westley being difficult

The Worst: Westley treating Buttercup like she’s unfaithful is terrible. She thought he was dead for five years. She should be permitted to move on! Instead he says the promise of a woman means nothing, and that she is incapable of love. It is like Odysseus questioning Penelope’s loyalty after being gone so long, after she had been nothing but loyal to him.

Westley’s Death

The Worst: Something about the whole death scene bugs me. You know from the beginning Westley cannot die in a comedy, since he is the hero. “Mostly” dead is funny, but not convincing.

Fight Scene: Inigo vs. Count Rugen

Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.”

The Best: We finally get to see Inigo avenge his father. I hate the point where Inigo is seriously wounded with a knife because I remember that was when I thought he might fail, forgetting that this movie is a comedy. This is probably the most serious part in the whole movie. Rugen is a complete coward, initially running away, throwing a knife from afar. This is not the honorable fight that we saw in Inigo vs. Westley. Inigo echoes the wounds Rugen gave him, including the facial scars, before killing him.

A Fight to the Pain

The Best: Westley challenges Humperdinck to a “fight to the pain,” which is basically a way to leave someone alive but barely after a fight, but the way he speaks of it is frightening and scares Humperdinck into surrendering, even though it is a bluff. It’s creative the way he chooses how to cause the most pain.

Conclusion

The Princess Bride is a classic that you won’t want to miss if you haven’t already watched it.

Recommended Links

  • A great Youtube video breakdown of the Inigo vs. Westley fight by Jill Bearup
  • A great Youtube video breakdown of Inigo vs. Rugen fight by Jill Bearup
Anime, Shows

A Dark Anime Featuring An Unbreakable Sibling Bond

Spoiler-Free Anime Review:

Demon Slayer: Kimetsu No Yaiba Season 1

Rating: 10 out of 10 stars

Intro

Demon Slayer is an anime I watched because I heard people say it is better than My Hero Academia. I actually like it less than My Hero Academia, but that’s only because I prefer more light-hearted anime in general. Demon Slayer is, in fact, really fascinating and enjoyable to watch.

I watched the first half of the season with my dad and siblings and ended up watching the rest alone at college.

Warning: Even though this review does not have a significant spoilers, it does describe some plot details from Episode 1.

Background

Demon Slayer Season 1 was released in 2019, and is based on a manga series of the same name. It was written by Koyoharu Goutuge. It can currently be watched on Netflix, Hulu, Crunchyroll, or Funimation.

Summary

After Tanjiro’s family is slaughtered and his sister is turned into a demon, he studies to become a demon slayer to avenge his family and cure his sister.

Pros

  • Complex characters
  • Engaging combat
  • Demons are unique and have various skills
  • Great intro and outro
  • Catchy music
  • Taisho secrets
  • Attractive animation

Cons

  • No specific cons

Observations

  • It is a bit gory

Review

Characters

Tanjiro Kamado is the main character. He is a kind young man who sells charcoal to support his family until their untimely demise. His sense of smell is impeccable, significantly affecting the storyline believe it or not. He can pick up the smell of blood from far away or tell that a broken object was knocked over by a cat. He also can understand birds. He is extremely hardworking and loyal.

We barely get to know Nezuko Kamado before she is turned into a demon. She struggles with a violent side at times, but her connection to Tanjiro is heartwarming.

Zenitsu is generally cowardly and kind of pervy. Unlike in some anime, he is scolded for his behavior frequently and luckily doesn’t do anything as invasive as, for example, Mineta from My Hero Academia. There is more to him than meets the eye, however.

Inosuke is strong, socially inept, insensitive, and stubborn. Yet he is also quick to forget a grudge or even why he was angry in the first place. He is annoyed by Zenitsu’s weakness and Tanjiro’s kindness.

Combat

The combat in Demon Slayer is multi-layered and complex. Breathing technique is a huge component in an individual’s capacity to fight. Demon slayers master various forms to learn to attack, often related to the elements. Those who cannot kill demons by beheading them resort to other methods such as poisons. There is also something called the thread that Tanjiro can see, which shows him when there is an opening.

Demons

Each demon has a different specialty and many have different blood demon arts. The one depicted above, for example, is nicknamed the Arrow Demon and can redirect movements and launch opponents. Another interesting one is the Drum demon, which can perform different attacks by beating various drums embedded in its body.

The demons almost all have tragic backstories because they were once human before the traumatic event of being turned into demons.

Intro

The Demon Slayer Season 1 intro not only is a great introduction into future events in the first season, it also has great catchy music. It is well-made and intriguing.

Outro

The artistic design of the outro is beautiful, from the vibrant flowers at the beginning to the rendering of Nezuko shown above.

Taisho secrets

The Taisho secret at the end of each episode provides more insight into characters and is a fun way to tease about the next episode.

Animation

The animation of Demon Slayer is beautiful and terrifying. I especially liked the eyes of the characters and the design of the demons.

Conclusion

I would say if you don’t mind shows being a little bloody and violent, and you like anime, then you will probably like this show. Definitely recommend for ages 13 and up.

Rating System

If you are interested in how I rate shows, check out my rating system.

Links