Life

Stories From My College Years

Intro

On May 15th of this year (2021), I graduated from Grove City College with a B.A. in English. It was a bittersweet day. Not only was it the culmination of four years of effort, it was also the end of a treasured time in my life. I made so many friends at college who I will always appreciate.

The day of my graduation I had a headache from lack of coffee and allergies. My new dress shoes literally wore holes in two of my toes. The ceremony itself was boring, and the time afterwards was a rush of taking pictures and moving out. When I think back on my time at Grove City College, there are many moments I will always love to think about, but graduation itself will not be one of them. That being said, I am grateful that I made it to graduation despite setbacks due to the pandemic.

I found it kind of funny that we were told due to concerns about COVID-19 and people’s squeamishness, instead of a handshake the president would give us a hug and fist bump. First of all, how is that better from a contagiousness standpoint? Also, sorry, but a fist bump could never be formal enough for a graduation ceremony.

I was nervous when I finally walked across the stage to receive my diploma. I was told to flip my tassel to the other side of my cap before or after reaching the president. Because I’m me, I flipped my tassel the second I reached the president, no doubt right when the photographer snapped the picture.

With my graduation behind me, I can’t help reminiscing about some of the funny moments of being an undergraduate. I decided to share some of my favorite stories below.

The Perfect Horror Movie

One night near midnight during my freshman year my roommate and I were walking back to our dorm. Now, Grove City College is a very safe campus. But we got to talking about what we would do if we were attacked. Since I had dabbled in martial arts for years, I suggested I would use my lanyard with the keys at the end of it to strike at the attacker’s face.

We discussed different methods of self-defense, and then the topic changed to horror movies. We were going to walk in the dark area between the chapel and the dorms and we mentioned how it would have been the perfect scenario for a horror movie–us walking through the on-campus equivalent of a dark alley.

When we reached the poorly lit spot between the chapel and dorms, to our utter surprise a robed figure with a black hood emerged out of the darkness. He looked like the freakin’ grim reaper. We were speechless. Then I began to laugh. I laughed uncontrollably and didn’t stop until several minutes after we were safely in our dorm.

I learned later that there was a guy who liked to go around campus dressed in that fashion, completely in black with a robe and hood. Another time I saw him during the day, when it was a lot less intimidating.

Looking back, I am surprised I wasn’t more scared about seeing a grim reaper look-alike. I guess the situational irony was just too perfect.

Rooming Situation

Room Draw, when students at GCC chose their rooms for next semester, became the most despised time of the year for me. Besides finals of course. Two times I nearly ended up in tears at Room Draw and the third time was the best because I was absent.

The first time we tried to get nice rooms and accidentally ended up in the “mole hole.” On the website it was listed as a room on the ground floor. It was not on the ground floor. It was below the ground, a small room with no windows. We were thinking it would be a big room and had never even realized there were dorms without windows in the basement. There was a single bathroom with only one stall for the whole hall and pipes coming out of the hall ceiling.

Anyway, I called my mom and started laughing so hard about it that I was tearing up. My mom advised me to go back and ask for a different room, which I did when I had finally quit cracking up. We ended up in a decent room with windows. And as my roommate said, it had “beautiful bathrooms.”

The second time I had an all-nighter the day before, when I was working on a unit plan. I knew I had another long night ahead. The unit plan was made up of 9 lesson plans, each of which took 4-5 hours.

My roommate and two friends were counting on me to pick out rooms for all of us. None of them were available to go to Room Draw, but they wanted a suite. We were sure that we would get a suite since the year before even sophomores had been able to get suites.

We each had a number that would determine our order to pick a room. We went with the lowest out of our numbers which we were allowed to do since we were planning on being suitemates.

Long story short, all the suites were taken long before they reached my number. And when they finally reached that number, I found out I needed to get the lowest number from my two friends too. In other words, it was a mess and I was so tired and I had to get the number and then get back in line and pick random rooms for my friends.

I was so worried about what my friends would think. Because at that time, I barely knew them. They would not really be “my friends” until later. I only knew my roommate well, not the other two girls I wanted to have a suite with.

By the time I got to choose the second room, I felt like I was going to cry. The lady I told my choice to seemed to notice, and I blamed it on the all-nighter, which was no doubt partially to blame.

I ended up having another all-nighter that night.

In short, I associate Room Draw with bad memories.

Pledge Week

I had a good relationship with sororities and fraternities most of the time at college. Being an introvert who hates crowds and loud noises, I avoided them like the plague. They didn’t know I existed. Perfect.

Pledge week was like a thing out of my nightmares.

My friend and I learned quickly that we couldn’t be anywhere near the cafeteria during Greek dinners. Every time a new girl would come in, a sorority would say in monotone robotic voices, “Hello Miss Abigail…Hello Miss….”

There would be people in full mountain gear latching themselves to the stair rail and crawling up and down the stairs. Meanwhile, I am just trying to get root beer without making eye contact.

I did enjoy listening to the guys put on an impromptu play in the middle of the cafeteria, but that had to be the one greek-life-related experience that I somewhat appreciated.

All the other stuff involving people miserably wearing wrinkled, rotting carrots and carrying around skulls kinda made me uncomfortable.

One encounter with a fraternity during pledge week was the most memorable. My roommate and I were headed to Hicks cafeteria when we saw a line of men in masks and robes holding flowers. (This was before Covid-19 made masks all the rage.) We both sped up, but she was faster and made it through the door. I was not so lucky.

“May I escort you to the cafeteria?” one of the masked men asked.

I froze. My face was burning, and I sputtered out “Sure…” Why? Why did I say that?

He hooked his arm through mine and led me to the cafeteria. My roommate held the door open for us, grinning. I glared at her. The guy gave me a plastic flower. I almost threw it away when he left but ended up keeping it for a few weeks. I found it funny that it was the first gift a guy outside my family had ever given me.

The Creeking

I toured Grove City College the first time with my roommate and her family. The second time I brought my family along, but we got separated and they ended up going on the tour without me–they told me about their experience later. Right when the tour guide finished talking about what a safe campus it was, a bunch of college guys walked past chanting “wolf creek” and pitched someone into the creek. The timing made it hilarious. My family didn’t know this at the time, but it is a tradition at Grove City College to “creek” a man after he gets engaged.

Sour Patch Kids

I bought my roommate a massive bag of Sour Patch Kids for her birthday because I know she loves them. She graciously shared them with me. We made a game out of eating them. Since we both hate orange, we would reach in without looking and have to eat whatever we picked up. We both laughed when one of us got orange and had to eat it. I guess it was good we ate them. Otherwise we would have thrown all those orange ones away!

Conclusion

I hope you enjoyed hearing about my college experience. Let me know your college or school stories in the comments! P.S. I have another post coming about my college experiences, which I will call The Colby Chronicles.

Shows

LoK Season 2’s Horrible Spirit Wonderland

Spoiler-Free Show Review:

The Legend of Korra Season 2

Rating: 4 out of 10 stars

Intro

Don’t get me wrong. I love the Avatar universe and The Legend of Korra (LoK). But Season 2 takes all the worst parts of Avatar lore, runs like a bad fanfiction, and introduces lasting consequences that should never have been a problem in the first place. This is my second time watching it, and I hated it even more the second time.

If you decide to skip Season 2, I recommend reading my spoiler review of it instead of this one, because it will sum up the main takeaways from Season 2 and prepare you to understand the beginning of Season 3.

Background

The Legend of Korra Season 2, called Spirits, was released in 2013. It was animated partially by Studio Mir and partially by Pierrot. The creators are Michael Dante DiMartino and Brian Konietzko

Season 2 might have been better if it weren’t for strained relations with Nickelodeon and if the series had been planned out better in the first place. Initially, the creators of The Legend of Korra were only contracted for Season 1, so getting a Season 2 had been up in the air.

Summary

Season 2 begins six months after the first season. Korra has to find a way to deal with increasing unrest between the spirit world and the natural world and stop the embodiment of evil and chaos from being released on the world.

Pros

  • Introduction of numerous new characters
  • Get to see a beloved old character
  • The story of the first avatar was creative
  • Pretty animation at times
  • Good music

Cons

  • Abusive relationship between Bolin and a Water Tribe girl played for laughs
  • Relationship between Varrick and Zhu Li uncomfortable as well
  • Korra acting obnoxious in her relationship with Mako
  • More drama with the love triangle that is just too much
  • Bolin kisses a woman without consent
  • Bolin being a little too dumb
  • Has the worst villain of all the seasons
  • Too much spirit mumbo-jumbo
  • Serious permanent consequences that I really hate because why, oh why…
  • Really awful ending

Review

Characters

Eska and Desna are Korra’s twin cousins They are typically emotionless, passive, and disinterested in life around them. However, they can be stirred to anger under the right circumstances.

They come from the Northern Water Tribe and are visiting the Southern Water Tribe for the Glacier Spirits Festival. They are skilled waterbenders.

Bumi and Kya are Tenzin’s siblings.

Bumi, the one on the left in the picture, is a nonbender who is brash, stubborn, and fond of telling long and often pointless stories about his military career.

Kya, shown on the right in the picture, is a waterbender whose skill rivals her mother Katara’s.

Varrick is eccentric businessman and inventor that Asami seeks to make a deal with. He is a flamboyant, intelligent, bossy genius. He’s definitely a fan-favorite, but in my opinion he is at his worst in this season.

He has an assistant named Zhu Li who is willing to do almost anything for him.

Origin Story

Avatar Wan

Season 2 introduces the story of Avatar Wan, the first Avatar, and his relationship with the spirits Raava and Vaatu. This is the best part of Season 2, by far. It adds so much lore to the Avatar universe.

Raava and Vaatu

Relationships

There is one clearly abusive relationship in this season between Bolin and a Water Tribe girl. She treats him like a slave and exerts greater and greater control over him. When Bolin asks his friends for help, they shrug it off and give him less than helpful advice.

The love triangle of Asami, Mako, and Korra needs to stop. At this point it becomes painful and dramatic and it is easy to grow sick of the whole thing.

Varrick treats Zhu Li like some sort of slave and it becomes increasingly apparent that he is unable to appreciate her worth. Their interactions are uncomfortable at best, and cause one to wonder why a woman would degrade herself in this way for such a self-centered man.

The Bolin Problem

Bolin is not at his best in this season. When he is not a submissive, uncomfortable part of a toxic relationship, he is doing stupid and inappropriate things such as kissing a woman without her consent.

The Spirit World Problem

The Spirit World is like Wonderland, and I hate Wonderland. Nothing makes sense. Things change without warning. And with dark forces involved, spirits quickly turn from good to evil and back again. This whole season is about Korra finding herself spiritually, and in the spirit world she is figuratively and literally lost.

The spirit world in Avatar: The Last Airbender was so much better, because it stayed mysterious and kind of creepy. In Season 2 of The Legend of Korra it lost its cryptic quality.

Ending

The ending sucks. It’s like you are watching a completely different show than Season 1. It introduces lasting consequences that Avatar fans will be disappointed with for seasons to come.

Animation

The animation is a little bit nicer in this season than in the previous season. When telling Avatar Wan’s story, the animators changed the style. I like that choice as it feels liked it amped up the feeling of storytelling. The style was elsewhere surprisingly consistent considering two different studios were working on it.

Music

The music had a somber quality appropriate for the more spiritual themes of this season.

Conclusion

If you read this and then decided Season 2 wasn’t worth your time, check out my spoiler version of this review. I don’t recommend watching it, but if you can’t bring yourself to skip it, there are some redeemable qualities mentioned above, so it’s not a complete waste of time.

Honestly, I think this season was appropriate for most people ages 10 and up.

Rating System

If you are interested in how I rate show, check out my rating system.

Links

Related Articles

Shows

LoK Season 2’s Horrible Spirit Wonderland (SPOILERS)

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is legend-of-korra-season-2-1.jpg

Show Review:

The Legend of Korra Season 2

Rating: 4 out of 10 stars

Intro

Don’t get me wrong. I love the Avatar universe and The Legend of Korra (LoK). But Season 2 takes all the worst parts of Avatar lore, runs like a bad fanfiction, and introduces lasting consequences that should never have been a problem in the first place. This is my second time watching it, and I hated it even more the second time.

This review is filled with spoilers. It may not be worthwhile to you to watch Season 2, and if you read this blog post it will summarize everything of importance from that season, allowing you to skip Season 2 if you desire without being lost during Season 3.

Background

The Legend of Korra Season 2, called Spirits, was released in 2013. It was animated partially by Studio Mir and partially by Pierrot. The creators are Michael Dante DiMartino and Brian Konietzko

Season 2 might have been better if it weren’t for strained relations with Nickelodeon and if the series had been planned out better in the first place. Initially, the creators of The Legend of Korra were only contracted for Season 1, so getting a Season 2 had been up in the air.

Summary

Season 2 begins six months after the first season. Korra has to find a way to deal with increasing unrest between the spirit world and the natural world. When her uncle Unalaq convinces her to open the Southern Spirit portal, chaos ensues. To make matters worse, the Northern Water Tribe invades and seizes control of the Southern Water Tribe. Additionally, we learn about the first avatar and the continual fight between Raava and Vaatu–the embodiment of good and the embodiment of evil, respectively.

Pros

  • Introduction of numerous new characters
  • Get to see old characters–Iroh and Admiral Zhao
  • The story of the first avatar was creative
  • Pretty animation at times
  • Good music

Cons

  • Abusive relationship between Bolin and Eska played for laughs
  • Relationship between Varrick and Zhu Li uncomfortable as well
  • Korra acting obnoxious in her relationship with Mako
  • More drama with the love triangle that is just too much
  • Bolin kisses a woman without consent
  • Bolin being a little too dumb
  • Has the worst villain of all the seasons
  • Too much spirit mumbo-jumbo
  • Serious permanent consequences that I really hate because why, oh why…
  • Really awful ending

Review

Characters

Eska and Desna are Korra’s twin cousins and the children of Unalaq. They are typically emotionless, passive, and disinterested in life around them. However, they can be stirred to anger under the right circumstances.

They come from the Northern Water Tribe and are visiting the Southern Water Tribe for the Glacier Spirits Festival. They are skilled waterbenders.

Bumi and Kya are Tenzin’s siblings.

Bumi, the one on the left in the picture, is a nonbender who is brash, stubborn, and fond of telling long and often pointless stories about his military career.

Kya, shown on the right in the picture, is a waterbender whose skill rivals her mother Katara’s.

Varrick is eccentric businessman that Asami seeks to make a deal with. He is a flamboyant, intelligent, bossy, occasionally obnoxious genius. He’s definitely a fan-favorite, but in my opinion he is at his worst in this season.

He has an assistant named Zhu Li who is willing to do almost anything for him.

Origin Story

Avatar Wan

Season 2 introduces the story of Avatar Wan, the first Avatar, and his relationship with the spirits Raava and Vaatu. This is the best part of Season 2, by far. It adds so much lore to the Avatar universe.

Wan’s story starts in a world where lion turtles guard the secrets of the elements and allow various people of the tribes that live on their backs to borrow elemental powers from them. In other words, the lion turtles give people the gift of bending a particular element–fire, air, water, or earth.

Wan borrows the power of firebending from the lion turtle to join a hunting party, but does not give it back when he is supposed to. He then tries to help the poor in his town by robbing the rich with firebending–like a kind of Robin Hood figure. As a result, he is banished to the Spirit Wilds.

When seeking sanctuary among the inhabitants of the Spirit Wilds, Wan is initially rejected by them. After he rescues a trapped cat deer, risking his life in the process, the spirits accept him.

Two years after being banished, Wan decided to find other lion turtle cities. He left with the cat deer, Mula, and during his travels stumbled upon Raava and Vaatu locked in a desperate battle. When Vaatu begged for help, saying he had been tormented by Raava for ten thousand years, Wan used his bending to separate them.

This turned out to be a mistake, as Vaatu was the spirit of darkness and evil. Raava explained the error Wan had made and rejected his offer to help capture Vaatu again. Wan continued on his journey and found an airbending village where Vaatu turned benign spirits malevolent. Wan managed to protect the airbending village until Raava arrived.

Vaatu bragged about how he would destroy Raava when Harmonic Convergence arrived. Raava was growing weaker, so she agreed to join Wan. Wan asked for the power of airbending from the lion turtle whose village he had saved, and was granted it, though Raava was required to hold most of this power until Wan was able to master it.

Wan and Raava traveled together to other lion turtle cities as Avatar Wan mastered the four elements. Coming across a conflict between humans and spirits that escalated when Vaatu turned the spirits dark, Wan temporarily merged with Raava. This allowed him to control all four elements at once. The strain was too much and Wan passed out. After he woke up, he learned that the humans had all been killed.

Raava was so small that he put her in a teapot and carried her with him to the Southern spirit portal, determined to face Vaatu. Wan fights Vaatu and merges again with Raava to get an edge in battle. This time, the merging is permanent, and Wan becomes the first Avatar through this fusion.

Wan defeated Vaatu and trapped him in the Tree of Time. He then spent the entire rest of his life attempting to bring peace to the world. Although he was not successful, he was reincarnated in what was the beginning of the Avatar cycle.

Raava and Vaatu

Relationships

The relationships in this season are so messed up.

First off, there’s Bolin and Eska to contend with. Their relationship is meant to be funny, but it is obviously abusive. That this is a relationship without consent on one side becomes increasingly apparent, even though Bolin repeatedly and reluctantly submits in the toxic relationship.

Their first conversation offers hints and red flags.

Eska: You amuse me. I will make you mine.

Bolin: You mean like a boyfriend? Or…like a slave?

Eska: Yes. Win me prizes.

It gets to the point where Eska dictates how Bolin (and Pabu) dress. She also tries to control Bolin’s future and force him into a marriage with her.

When Bolin goes to his friends for help, they do not take him seriously. And when Bolin tries to break up with Eska, he is threatened. The entire relationship is unhealthy and destructive.

The Bolin Problem

Bolin is not at his best in this season. When he is not a submissive, uncomfortable part of a toxic relationship, he is doing stupid and inappropriate things such as kissing a woman without her consent.

When Bolin becomes a mover (movie) star, it is clear that he does not understand the concept of acting. When Ginger pretends to be into him during a scene, he kisses her even though it is not in the script. When she is understandably angry, he doesn’t get it.

While this is meant to be funny, making Bolin dumb enough to do inappropriate and irrational things makes him a far-cry from the lovable Bolin of Season 1.

The Spirit World Problem

The Spirit World is like Wonderland, and I hate Wonderland. Nothing makes sense. Things change without warning. And with Vaatu involved, spirits quickly turn from good to evil and back again. This whole season is about Korra finding herself spiritually, and in the spirit world she is figuratively and literally lost.

Korra turns into a child in the spirit world temporarily, helps a damaged spirit, and meets good ol’ Uncle Iroh from Avatar: The Last Airbender. This brings up more questions than answers. For instance, what is the afterlife for people of this universe? Just passing on to the spirit world? Why aren’t there more dead people around?

Also, Korra and Iroh and some spirits basically have a tea party, which makes it all too much like the tea party with the Mad Hatter in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. And Korra shrinks and grows like Alice… Did I mention I hate Wonderland?

Even if you like Wonderland, you’re unlikely to like this Wonderland knock-off.

The spirit world in Avatar: The Last Airbender was so much better, because it stayed mysterious and kind of creepy. In Season 2 of The Legend of Korra it lost its cryptic quality.

Ending

The ending sucks.

It introduces the concept of a dark avatar to the canon, which is honestly a mistake. The Vaatu and Unalaq combo is laughable even if it is destructive. It’s like the series jumped genres and became an animated Godzilla vs. Kong. It ends just about how you would expect – with Korra the victor and Unalaq vanquished in a bloodless way.

The real tragedy is that Korra permanently loses contact with her previous Avatar lives. It’s basically like someone hit the reset button on the Avatar cycles. It’s a horrible consequence that fans will be lamenting for seasons to come.

A cooler consequence is that Korra leaves the spirit portals open and spirits integrate with Republic City and the rest of the world.

Animation

The animation is a little bit nicer in this season than in the previous season. When telling Avatar Wan’s story, the animators changed the style. I like that choice as it feels liked it amped up the feeling of storytelling. The style was elsewhere surprisingly consistent considering two different studios were working on it.

Music

The music had a somber quality appropriate for the more spiritual themes of this season.

Conclusion

I wouldn’t recommend watching Season 2. This review says enough about the season to be able to move on to Season 3 with no problem. If you’ve already watched it…then sorry, I guess. Unless you liked it. Some people do.

Honestly, I think this season was appropriate for most people ages 10 and up.

Rating System

If you are interested in how I rate show, check out my rating system.

Links

Related Articles

Movies

Disney’s First Southeast Asian Princess

Spoiler-Free Movie Review:

Raya and the Last Dragon

Rating: 6 out of 10 stars

Intro

I had high expectations for this movie, but while the animation was fabulous, the rest was generally unimpressive. It looked really cool, but I couldn’t help feeling disappointed.

Background

Raya and the Last Dragon is a Disney movie that was released in 2021. Raya became the first Southeast Asian Disney princess.

This movie stars Kelly Marie Tran, Awkwafina, Izaac Wang, Gemma Chan, Daniel Dae Kim, Benedict Wong, Sandra Oh, Thalia Tran, Lucille Soong, and Alan Tudyk.

Summary

In the land of Kumandra, Raya the warrior princess must find the last dragon to restore her family and kingdom to its former prosperity.

Pros

  • Relationship between Raya and Namaari
  • Relationship between Chief Benja and Raya sweet
  • Animal life interesting
  • Cool idea that each dragon has a unique power
  • Somewhat unique villain
  • Strong theme that came through clearly
  • Well-researched setting
  • Somewhat developed cultures
  • Cool weapon
  • Stunning animation

Cons

  • Very predictable at points
  • Dragon design a little too cute and fuzzy to be the majestic beings they were made out to be
  • Concept worn thin at places
  • Despite being unique, villain was underdeveloped
  • Sad moments just weren’t that sad
  • Unmemorable sound tracks
  • Hit you over the head with the theme all the time

Review

Relationships

Raya and Namaari had an interesting and complex relationship throughout the film. Many people complain that despite the obvious chemistry between them, Disney was purposely ambiguous about whether either or both characters were gay, and I definitely see that point. It has a very queerbaity-feel because it definitely seemed like there could be romantic tension there. Even the actor playing Raya, Kelly Marie Tran, said openly that she believed her character was gay. I am hoping they have a sequel where they will have more space to develop their relationship further so that it is clear.

The relationship between Chief Benja and Raya was sweet. He is a father to her, but also a mentor. He embodies trust and hope and is a real role model for Raya.

Villain

The Druun are both a unique villain and an underdeveloped one. It was a creative idea but not well fleshed out. They end up being more like a natural disaster, yet seem to stem somehow from the evil of humans. None of this is well explained in the movie, but basically the villain is like a plague that turns people to stone.

Creatures

Tuk Tuk is Raya’s pet, an odd mix between a pill bug and an armadillo. It grows quite large and is surprisingly mobile even in its larger form.

Weapon

Raya’s weapon is a kind of whip sword, shifting between a normal sword form and a separated form that is longer and acts like a whip. This was much more creative than going with a traditional medieval-style sword.

Theme

The theme is trust. More specifically, that you should trust people regardless of whether you know them or if they have betrayed you in the past. This movie thrusts its theme in your face from beginning to end. While that is good for very young children, older children and adults may find this patronizing.

I wouldn’t say that this is a necessarily good or realistic theme, but for a kids movie, whatever. Generally it is good to trust people, but it’s also good to be smart about who you trust.

Setting

According to IMDb, the cultures and land of Kumandra were inspired by the countries of Vietnam, Thailand, Myanmar, Cambodia, Malaysia, the Phillipines, Indonesia, and Laos.

Kumandra is beautiful, consisting of various cultures known for certain traits but also defying those traits at times. A culture is not simple, and cannot be described in a couple sentences like Raya tried to in the beginning of the film. That becomes increasingly obvious as the film moves on.

The setting is beautiful, a mix of rivers, deserts, mountains, towns, and cities that were all beautifully animated.

Predictability

This was your formulaic Disney story. I won’t spoil it, but it had all the plot elements of a typical Disney movie. Yet it was much more dry, cliché, and lacking in emotion at some of the most critical moments of the film. However, it was nice that the movie had a strong female lead without having a man come in to save the day like in the earlier Disney films.

Soundtracks

None of the songs stuck out to me, unlike with the other Disney princess movies new and old. James Newton Howard composed the score, and while it added somewhat to the mood of several scenes, there were no takeaway anthems for this movie like there were for Tangled, Moana, and even Brave.

Animation

The animation of the backgrounds was phenomenal, particularly fog and water. The characters were not as well done but still pretty high quality animation.

Conclusion

If you like formulaic Disney, you may like this movie. But if you expect the movie to try anything new or exciting, you will be disappointed.

Rating System

If you are interested in how I rate movies, check out my rating system.

Links

  • Raya and the Last Dragon Trailer – quick note: It may be more fun to watch the movie without the trailer because the trailer actually spoils more than I was willing to in my article.