Shows

Sherlock Season 4 Does Not Measure Up

Spoiler-Free Show Review:

Sherlock Season 4

Rating: 7 out of 10 stars

Intro

Having enjoyed the first three seasons of Sherlock, I expected the last season to impress, but I ended up being disappointed. It was actually still somewhat enjoyable, but nowhere as phenomenal as the earlier seasons.

Warning! Even though there are no spoilers for Season 4 in this article, there are minor spoilers from previous seasons.

Background

Sherlock Season 4 aired in 2017 and was produced by BBC and Hartswood films. It is based off of Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes books, but instead of being placed in Victorian England, the show is set in modern-day London.

The show stars Benedict Cumberbatch, Martin Freeman, Rupert Graves, Una Stubbs, Mark Gatiss, Louise Brealey, Andrew Scott, and Amanda Abbington.

In addition to being nominated for various awards, Sherlock won in three categories in the Primetime Emmy Awards.

Pros

  • Phenomenal acting
  • Immersive setting highly relevant to a modern-day audience
  • Benefit of the familiar character of Sherlock with a new spin
  • Strong character development
  • A fascinating villain at the end of the season
  • Intelligent, occasionally comical, script
  • Catchy theme song and music

Cons

  • A lackluster first villain of the season
  • Sherlock’s ability to predict the future stretches believability
  • Unnecessarily confusing, especially in the last episode
  • Yet more predictable in the first episode

Observations

  • You could probably stop watching at Season 3 if you wanted a better ending for the series

Review

Acting

The acting, especially by Benedict Cumberbatch, Martin Freeman, was incredible. They each played their parts well.

All of the fantastic and obnoxious qualities of Sherlock were brought out and emphasized. The way that the actors for Sherlock, Watson and Mary interact shows great chemistry and skill.

Setting

Sherlock Holmes - Wikiwand
Sherlock and Watson’s flat

The setting in Season 4 is the same as Seasons 1-3, unsurprisingly: modern-day London. The presence of modern conveniences such as security cameras and phones remains a way for this new Sherlock to test his intellect. John Watson records their adventures through a blog, another modern touch. This transition from the Victorian London of the books to modern-day London is seamless.

Characters

Sherlock is a highly intelligent man who lacks empathy. He is nevertheless shown on several occasions to have at least some degree of care depending on who the person is. He is always blunt, but occasionally shows remorse for his words when they have caused damage.

Watson is of higher-than-average intelligence, but he cannot compete with Sherlock. Watson, however, has a deep sense of empathy and values human life while wanting to negate human suffering. He has a high tolerance for Sherlock, but even he loses his temper sometimes at Sherlock’s careless comments ill-timed deductions, and drug habit.

This season introduces more tension between Watson and Sherlock when Sherlock makes a critical error.

The first villain is creepy at least, but he lacks the style and creativeness of villains such as Moriarty. The second villain is fascinating and more intelligent than Sherlock and Mycroft. She once cut open her skin because she wanted to see how her muscles worked. Unfortunately, I cannot provide a picture of either of them without spoiling the series.

Script

The script of Season 4 is actually pretty good. There are several quotable moments. For example, an unexpected reflection on suicide by Sherlock.

“Taking your own life. Interesting expression– taking it from who? Once it’s over, it’s not you who’ll miss it. Your own death is something that happens to everybody else. Your life is not your own. Keep your hands off it.”

There is also a decent amount of humor in the fourth season.

Watson: “I need a second opinion.”

Sherlock: “Oh, please, John. Since when have you ever managed TWO opinions. You’d fall over.”

There is even some genuine sincerity on the part of Sherlock:

Mycroft: “Dr. Watson? Could you please leave?”

Sherlock: “John stays.”

Mycroft: “This is about family.”

Sherlock: “THAT’S why he stays!”

Music

The theme music is catchy as always, and the music throughout the episodes is fitting and develops the mood.

Believability

Sherlock’s skills were always unbelievably amazing, but now he adds telling the future to his repertoire of skills. He predicts the exact location and time of events without a strong explanation as to how he managed to do so. Making Sherlock near-omniscient was not a good choice.

Predictability

The level of predictability for the first episode is higher than the rest of the episodes. Sherlock’s mistake is unsurprising, as well as the results.

Confusion

All the confusion in the series stems from one villain. Somehow the creators made her whole storyline extremely convoluted. I found myself wondering, what the heck just happened? The villain was impressive, but the events surrounding her created too much confusion.

Conclusion

Even though I found this season somewhat enjoyable, I think that you may be better off stopping at Season 3. That’s what my siblings ended up doing and I don’t blame them.

I recommend this season for audiences ages 13+.

Rating System

If you are interested in how I rate shows, check out my rating system.

Links

Related Articles

Movies

A Romance Masquerading as Horror

Spoiler-Free Movie Review:

Rebecca (2020)

Rating: 4 out of 10 stars

Intro

I had high expectations for this movie. The trailer was intriguing and even looked spooky. Unfortunately, the movie did not satisfy. I haven’t read the book it is based on, so I cannot compare the two, but I have heard that the book is much better.

Background

This version of Rebecca was released in 2020 and is based on a novel of the same name by Daphne du Maurier. It fits into the genre of romantic thriller. The movie stars Lily James, Armie Hammer, Kristen Scott Thomas, Ann Dowd, Keeley Hawes, and Sam Riley.

Summary

An unnamed newlywed woman is brought to Manderley, her husband Maxim de Winter’s English estate. There she desires to live happily, but cannot help contending with the memory of Rebecca, Maxim’s first wife. She feels threatened by Mrs. Danver’s, a servant in the house who was intensely loyal to Rebecca. As she spends more time at Manderley, the details of Rebecca’s life start to fall into place and mysteries begin to unravel.

Pros

  • Narrative voice at the beginning compelling
  • Acting by Kristen Scott Thomas was excellent
  • Several memorable quotes
  • Not very predictable
  • General setting attractive, especially Manderley

Cons

  • Most of the acting fell flat
  • Suspense was lacking
  • The protagonist was unnamed, which felt unnecessary
  • Maxim de Winter’s signature mustard yellow suit looks terrible
  • The trailer suggested undertones of horror that were never realized in the film
  • The movie dragged and then wound up too quickly

Review

Narrative Voice

The story begins with narration by the unnamed protagonist:

Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again. I dreamt that where our drive once lay, a dark and tortured jungle grew. Nature had come into her own and yet the house still stood. Manderley. Secretive and silent as it had always been. Risen from the dead. Like all dreamers, I was allowed to pass through my memory. Spanning the years like a bridge. Back to that summer in Monte Carlo when I knew nothing and had no prospects.”

This imaginative language drew me into the story. I only wish that the story had merited such a beginning.

Acting

The acting by Kristen Scott Thomas (Mrs. Danvers) was excellent. Watching her subtle expression when she welcomed the protagonist into the house gave an immediate indicator of how well her character was going to be portrayed. Her loyalty to Rebecca seemed intense and sincere, as did her hatred of the new Mrs. de Winters.

Armie Hammer (Maxim de Winter) came off differently. It was like he was trying to play the wrong role. His intimacy was too intimate, and his subsequent coldness was too cold. It was as if he were trying to act out two separate roles, and that made the romance hard to enjoy.

Lily James (Mrs. de Winter) made for a timid protagonist that it was easy to feel sorry for but hard to really root for.

Suspense

There’s not much to say about suspense. There wasn’t any. For there to be suspense, you have to care what’s going to happen to the characters, and I really didn’t.

Sure, it wasn’t very predictable, but that cannot in itself create suspense. There has to be emotional investment in the movie for suspense to exist.

Quotes

There were a couple good quotes from Maxim, and one notable one from Mrs. Danvers.

I’m asking you to marry me, you little fool.”

Maxim de Winter

Not the most romantic line, but pretty unique. I doubt I would appreciate being called a little fool, but whatever. If that’s her thing.

All marriages have their secrets.”

Maxim de Winter

Again, not the most romantic thing one could say. I mean, it’s probably true. Most married people likely keep secrets from each other, but most people are not blunt enough to come out and say it. Trust and communication are not Maxim’s strong points, even though that’s what relationships need to be stable and healthy.

I wonder what’s she’s thinking about you.”

Mrs. Danvers

This line, delivered with finesse by Mrs. Danvers to the new Mrs. de Winter, is chilling. The “she” in the quote is the late Mrs. Rebecca de Winter. It’s one of those lines that make it seem like the movie is pretending to be a horror film. The trailer itself gives off horror vibes, and you get the feeling from the trailer that this is some ghost story, but it really is not. Nonetheless, this quote fits with the creepiness of Mrs. Danvers extremely well.

Setting

The setting is beautiful, whether it’s Manderley itself, the beach, the restaurants–all of it. The detail taken with the house made and the way the protagonist interacted with the things in the house made it all too clear how out of place the protagonist felt.

Details

The fact that the protagonist was never named bothered me. I know the movie was keeping with the tradition in the novel and earlier adaptation of not naming her, but this doesn’t really constitute an excuse. Why was she never named in the movie? It’s frustrating trying to refer to her and having nothing to call her before she is married and nothing to call her afterwards other than Mrs. de Winters after she is married. Names are so strongly tied into who people are. They, in a sense, make their names mean something by their actions. The fact that she doesn’t have a name makes her seem like a non-person, a non-character or like an extra with too many lines.

There isn’t any reason given during the movie for her not having a name, and her husband never uses it, which is so weird. Even when I am talking to my friends, I address them by name. How much more would this be true if I were in an intimate romantic relationship with someone?

Screenrant has an interesting article about why she was not named and regards it as a creative choice, but I still think it was an unfortunate decision.

Maxim de Winter’s suit near the beginning couldn’t help but call to mind images of the Man in the Yellow Hat from Curious George. I don’t like the mustard color. He also wears this outfit repeatedly during their courtship period. He’s a rich dude, so he should be able afford some changes of clothes and at least something more aesthetically pleasing. I checked to see if I was the only one with this opinion, but looking at the reviews on IMDb, it seems I am not alone.

Conclusion

I wouldn’t recommend this movie for anyone, honestly. I would say it’s rating of PG-13 is reasonable due to sexual content, but there is nothing scary about Rebecca.

Rating System

If you are interested in how I rate movies, check out my rating system.

Links

Movies

A Movie About A Girl Struck by a Star

Spoiler-Free Movie Review:

Starstruck

Rating: 5 out of 10 stars

Intro

Last semester, my friends and I decided to watch each other’s childhood movies. This was a movie two of my friends had watched, but it was new to me. Even though the movie failed to win my admiration, I still enjoyed the experience of watching it with them.

Background

Starstruck is a rom-com and Disney Channel Original Movie released in 2010. It stars Sterling Knight, Danielle Campbell, Brandon Mychal Smith, Maggie Castle, and Chelsea Staub.

Starstruck is available on Disney+.

Summary

Michigan teen Jessica Olson visits her widowed grandmother in Hollywood, California. Her celebrity-obsessed sister Sarah convinces her to go to a nightclub where Sarah hopes to meet teen idol Christopher Wilde. When Christopher attempts to make a quick escape from the crowds after his performance, he accidentally hits Jessica with a door, and voila! The real story begins.

Pros

  • Catchy songs
  • Acting by Sterling Knight and Brandon Mychal Smith is decent
  • Beautiful scenery
  • Some character growth
  • Sweet, understanding grandma who really understands the protagonist
  • Wholesome, loving relationship between grandmother and boyfriend
  • Strong message
  • A fitting title

Cons

  • The female lead is hard to like
  • The movie star male lead is spoiled and occasionally a thoughtless jerk
  • Acting by most of the characters is not very good
  • Predictable
  • One picture taken from an impossible angle (they are looking down at the camera but it is taking a picture of them from above
  • Paparazzi used as a plot device, but only appear when they are needed to move the plot forward
  • How do their clothes manage to be so clean after the amount of mud and dirty creek water they slosh through

Review

Characters

First, I would like to say that I do sympathize with Jessica Olson’s lack of interest in celebrities. Personally, I rarely pay any attention to the lives of celebrities: their marriages, pregnancies, divorces, scandals and all that stuff have no bearing on my life and cannot hold my interest.

Jessica is only interested in those she can have an in-depth, personal relationship with and I admire that. That’s just about the only thing I admire about her because she is otherwise a bratty, annoying teenager who evidences only some growth as a person (shown in the comments she makes to paparazzi).

Her personality is so flat that the Starstruck Fandom has only Christopher Wilde in her list of “likes” and once again only includes Christopher Wilde in her list of “dislikes.”

Christopher Wilde is spoiled, naïve, and behaves like a jerk in a memorable incident during the movie. To be fair, his life has been in many ways unhealthy. His parents are his employees and plan out his life based on what options are most lucrative. Paparazzi invade his private life and ruin his ability to have fun like a normal teenager. His friendships are limited in the beginning of the movie to employees, and while that friendship seems sincere, it is not a good sign to only have friends you have to pay.

Sarah Olson, Jessica’s older sister, is mostly bland and annoying, obsessed with Christopher Wilde. She shows a little bit of unexpected kindness toward the end but is otherwise shallow.

Albert Joshua “Stubby” Stubbins is Christopher Wilde’s best friend who also happens to be his driver. Honestly, I wish we saw more of him because he is a fun character with convictions.

The grandmother of Jessica and Sarah has a touchingly close relationship with Jessica, and her grandmother is able to understand her even when the other members of her family don’t. Her grandmother has a sweet relationship with her boyfriend, and it was nice to see the cute elderly couple just living life together contentedly in the midst of all the drama in the movie.

Music

The first song isn’t amazing, but after that the rest are pretty catchy. My favorite is Something About the Sunshine. It’s catchy and just fits the mood of the movie so well. I found one music video that has the lyrics but no spoilers. I know it’s not the best, but most of them have spoilers, unfortunately.

Acting

The acting is…passable. Nothing amazing, nothing too cringy. A scene with crying is unconvincing, and Sarah’s obsessive fangirliness seems fake and a little too over-the-top.

Plot

Predictable. A couple things were unexpected, but we all know how this movie ends. I’m not going to say it, even though it barely constitutes a spoiler, but the whole thing is cheesy and obvious and you should probably know that going in. It doesn’t make it a bad movie, but it makes it an average one.

Scenery

The scenery is beautiful, whether its the beach, the cityscape, or the path less traveled they go on to avoid the paparazzi.

Mistakes

The main mistake I really noticed was that one of the photographs in the movie is shown from an impossible angle based on the way they were holding the camera.

They also got really muddy at one point, and after swimming in a creek, they were perfectly, immaculately clean. I wish stains came out that easily, but no.

Message

This movie could serve as a warning to those who idolize child celebrities to not take it to a creepy and inhumane level by prying into their private lives. It points out the problem with magazines and shows that capitalize on scandal and ruin celebrities lives. It also offers a peek into the life of a child celebrity and the unique problems and struggles they face. This is a kind of an interesting route for Disney to take considering how many teen stars they use, and surprisingly insightful.

Title

Ah, I get it. It’s Starstruck because clumsy star Christopher Wilde strikes Jessica Olson in the face…with a door…repeatedly.

Or maybe it’s because the TV show Christopher Wilde was performing on was called “Starstruck.”

Or it could be because the word “starstruck” comes up in the lyrics of the first song he sings, and is in fact the name of that song.

For whatever reason it was chosen, I feel that it was a fitting choice.

Conclusion

If you are a fan of Disney, you may like this. If you are a fan of Disney Channel Original movies, you almost certainly will like it. Otherwise, it’s probably a waste of your time.

I want to point out that my rating of 5 out of 10 stars does not mean that it was a bad movie. It just means it was an average movie–that there was nothing that made it terrible or great.

The best audience for this movie would be preteens and teens.

Rating System

If you are interested in how I rate movies, check out my rating system.

Links

Anime, Shows

MHA’s Season 2 Super-Powered School Schedule

Spoiler-Free Anime Review:

My Hero Academia Season 2

Rating: 8.5 out of 10 stars

Intro

My Hero Academia (also known as MHA) is my favorite anime. I watched Season 2 for the second time with my dad, and I had a great time–despite the fact that my sister had me doing jumping jacks during all the intro and outros.

(I made her my coach during winter break, which was both the best and worst idea ever.)

Warning! Although this review has no spoilers for Season 2, it does have spoilers for Season 1.

Background

My Hero Academia Season 2 was released in 2017. It was produced by the studio Bones and directed by Kenji Nagasaki. The plot is based on the graphic novels by  Kōhei Horikoshi.

You can watch My Hero Academia on Crunchyroll, Funimation, and Hulu.

Summary

UA high school students participate in a sports festival, internships, and final exams.

Pros

  • Likeable characters with diverse personalities
  • Get to see a bit more of Class 1-B and the General Studies, Support, and Business classes
  • Intimidating villains
  • Creative quirks
  • Fantastic dialogue
  • Balanced plot with light-heartedness and darker aspects
  • The UA Sports Festival Arc is the best arc in all of Season 1 and 2
  • For once, the UA girls get a chance to shine
  • Actual consequences for poor decisions
  • Catchy music
  • Attractive outros and intros
  • Original art style

Cons

  • Mineta being his usual pervy self, sexual harassment basically treated as a joke
  • Mei Hatsume has a habit of getting uncomfortably close to people and being super touchy, an instance of probably unintentional harassment of the male characters

Observations

  • Maybe Midoriya was not quirkless–maybe his quirk was superpowered crying
  • Midoriya uses the most boring visualizations to try to control his power
  • And yet he’s still breaking fingers…

Review

Characters

Season 1 had so many great characters, and Season 2 not only developed them further, it added a host of new characters to enjoy. I especially appreciated that I got to see a bit more of Class 1-B and the General Studios, Support, and Business classes.

Hitoshi Shinso is a student of the General Studies department. He has a quirk that would be perfect for a villain, but that he wants to use to become a hero. However, he failed the entrance exam for the hero course because his quirk does not work against robots, even though it is highly effective against people. Shinso is an underdog character I couldn’t help rooting for even though he was pitted against Midoriya.

Mei Hatsume is assertive, stubborn, and incredibly intelligent. She is a student of UA’s Support Class, and her calls her inventions her “super cute babies.” Her quirk is that she can zoom her eyesight to be able to see things far away. Her main focus in the UA Sports Festival is advertising her inventions for pro heroes and investors to see.

Itsuka Kendo is the class rep of Class 1-B and is part of the hero course. Her quirk is Big Fist, her ability to make her hands larger, which allows her to be better able to block and attack. She keeps Class 1-B in line and is on good terms with Class 1-A.

Neito Monoma is an obsessive, rude, and stubborn student from Class 1-B. He takes his rivalry with Class 1-A really seriously, frequently mocking them. It’s a running joke that Kendo repeatedly knocks him out when he tries to pick fights with Class 1-A. He is particularly effective against Bakugo and has proven that he can stay cool in intense situations.

Gran Torino is another person worth mentioning, but I cannot go into the details of his character without spoiling him. It’s enough to say that he was a mentor to All-Might.

The main villain of Season 2 is an effective, terrifying foe.

Hero Killer Stain is a villain with actual ideals, disgusted by heroes who lack the pure intentions and true spirit of heroism. He kills those who fail to meet his frankly way-too-high standards.

Dialogue

My Hero Academia Season 2 has plenty of quotable moments. This one is from Midoriya, and sums up what being a hero is all about.

Meddling when you don’t need to is the essence of being a hero.”

There is also plenty of Midoriya being a funny awkward teenager.

I can’t believe I talked to a girl on the phone. It was like she was whispering in my ear!”

And who could forget All-Might’s ring tone?

A phone call…is here!”

Plot

Season 2 starts with the UA Sports Festival, which in my opinion is the best arc of Seasons 1 and 2. Why? Several reasons.

First, we get Todoroki’s backstory. If there were awards for the best backstory, it would have to go to him.

Second, Ochaco gets to take part in an amazing battle. Finally, a girl gets her chance to shine!

Third, Bakugo meets his match more than once. It’s satisfying to see him humbled somewhat by the impressive skill of his opponents.

Fourth, Midoriya makes a decision that leads to permanent consequences. That’s nice to see, especially since until that point, he experienced no lasting ill effects from using his immense power.

Right after the festival arc, there is a really fun episode when students choose their hero names and it is revealed how Eraser Head got his name.

The next arc involves the student internships. It’s nice to see most of the characters exhibit some growth through their experiences. As may be expected from My Hero Academia, this arc tends to be more on the dark side, but is neatly balanced with humor.

The final arc focuses on final exams, which include both studying for pencil-and-paper tests and practical exams. Momo gets a chance to show what she’s made of in the finals.

Music

Unlike the first season, Season 2 uses four theme songs, all of which I have enjoyed thoroughly. Click on the links if you want to listen for yourself. The music is upbeat, gets stuck in one’s head, and fits the intros and outros perfectly.

  1. Peace Sign by Kenshi Yonezu
  2. Dakara, Hitori ja nai by Little Glee Monster
  3. Sora ni Utaeba by amazarashi
  4. Datte Atashi no Hero by LiSA

If you ever need music to exercise to, My Hero Academia‘s playlist would be a phenomenal choice. I still exercise to this music.

Intros and Outros

The first intro for this season is mostly just the characters stretching. I love it though, because it gives some insight into the training the young heroes have to put themselves through on a daily basis.

The first outro highlights scenes with the girls of My Hero Academia, which is long overdue since the show tends to underrepresent the achievements of the female characters. My favorite part is finding Toru Hagakure, The Invisible Girl, in all of the scenes. It also emphasizes how the school is a positive environment where most of the students have become close friends.

The second intro is attractive with color themes and glimpses into character memories and foreshadows future events. Overall, it does not disappoint.

The second outro is My Hero Academia reimagined into the Fantasy genre. It’s clever, funny, and beautiful. It’s my favorite of all the outros I have seen in the four seasons of My Hero Academia I have watched so far.

Style

All Might Highlights Boku no Hero Academia My Hero Academia

According to IMDb, the animation was done by Studio Bones, which also did the style of Fullmetal Alchemist, another of my favorite anime.

The style is different from Fullmetal Alchemist because it uses bold, bright colors and deep shadows for contrast. The pupils of characters are much smaller than in most anime.

Perverted Aspects

Yep, Mineta is a perverted little freak as usual. He happens to be quite smart and score high on one of the exams, which prompts another character to say that perverts like him are only likeable if they are dumb.

I disagree…I would despise him just as much if he were dumb.

The fact that the girls sometimes fall for his tricks makes it even worse. In Season 2, Mineta fools all the girls of Class 1-A into wearing cheerleading suits.

Hatsume, on the other hand, is so touchy it’s almost as uncomfortable as the scenes with Mineta. At the very least she’s seems unaware she is being that way, which makes her somewhat better than Mineta.

Observations

From the beginning of My Hero Academia, Midoriya has been known to cry a lot. Now personally, I do not think that is a bad thing. And it doesn’t mean he is weak. Anyone who can break their bones repeatedly and keep fighting is not weak.

Seeing how impressively he cries in Season 2, I can’t help but wonder if he had a quirk before One-for-All–super-powered tears. Anyone who can spout such volumes of water from their eyes is pretty special.

Midoriya’s visualizations of microwaves are a recurring thing in Season 2. I cannot imagine a more boring metaphor.

And if you were hoping poor Midoriya would be done breaking fingers by the beginning of Season 2, you’re out of luck. Ew….

Conclusion

I fully recommend My Hero Academia, especially for anime fans. It would best fit an audience of ages 13 and up due to violence, serious injuries, and a perverted character.

Rating System

If you are interested in how I rate shows, check out my rating system.

Links